Home – Greenland (shortfilm)


Home In 10 years everything changes yet nothing has really changed
here for 1000 years. Children are born and raised. People still live in isolated
small villages. Everyone knows everyone. Even after 10 years of absence
everything seems familiar. But something is slightly off in
this arctic paradise. A warning that profound change
is coming. That changes are happening and will influence future
generations. People often ask me whether I
ever get homesick. If I miss Greenland. And my answer to them is “All the time”. Not a day has gone by without me thinking about this
place. And that is why I am so happy that I am fortunate enough to be able to come back and show
my kids their father’s hometown and the
place where he grew up. The abundance of beauty in the
spacious surroundings. Mountains. And the deep fiords. This is such a big part of them. These are places where so many
generations before spent their time playing,
fishing, making a living in the peaceful atmosphere where
weather and climate is king. The inuit call the spirit of the
weather “sila”. And here “sila” is something to
adore… … and something to be
respected. Growing up here was a happy
time. Family. Friends. Laughter. I couldn’t have had a better
upbringing. But being away for a prolonged
periode makes you see everything
from a different perspective. From a distance. You start to notice things. A 1000 years ago the Vikings
were the first immigrants that
settled in southern Greenland, bringing with them their ways of
living from Iceland and
Scandinavia. All around this arctic landscape
you can still find remnants, relics of you will, of their civilisation. As the generations past the
Vikings died out leaving the green land to the
Inuit. Today the Inuit have adapted to
a modern way of living with help from a new wave of
immigrants from Scandinavia. But just like a 1000 years ago change is happening. In Southern Greenland the
average temperature has risen 2
degrees in the last 150 years, and as a result new species are
introduced, glaciers are melting, and the weather patterns are
changing. And this not just on a small
scale but is common all around the
Arctic. Local Fishermen talk about a
great flux in the number of
fish and changes in the species of
fish that they catch. Tour operators report of melt
pools on the ice cap, an ice cap that is not supposed to melt. All around Greenland glaciers
are getting smaller. They’re melting. Each year hundreds of millions
of tonnes of ice melts and vanishes into the ocean. And just like the Vikings in the
beginning of the last millennium local farmers are now
experiencing great inconsistencies in the
weather patterns. Several different kinds of crops
can today be grown in the low-arctic parts of this
great island. Cattle is being raised on what
was once baren tundra covered
mountains. And trees grow taller here than
ever before. My forefathers have been living
here for a thousand years, and I truly hope that future
generations will be able to
enjoy the Greenland I know. The warmth of the people. The produce. And the way of living. My fear is that in this fragile
environment change has already
begun. You really notice after being
away for 10 years. Small things, but on a grand
scale. It really seems like the Inuit
once again are forced to adapt to new circumstances in an ever-
changing world. My only wish is that one day my
children will be able to bring their kids to experience the wonders of
this arctic paradise that I and so many generations
before me have come to call… “Home”

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